Russian Subway Explosion Destroys Innocent Lives

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Thirty-nine lives were stripped from innocent civilians on Monday, March 29th in Moscow during a terrorist subway bombing executed by two female suicide bombers. This subway bombing was acknowledged as the worst terrorist attack Russia has experiences since 2004 when a male suicide bomber took the lives of 41 people and injured over 120 at the Avtozavodskaya subway station.

The bombings took place at the Lubyanka station and the Park Kultury station. Moscow’s subway system is the world’s second busiest system in the world, shuttling millions of passengers daily to their places of destination. The first bomb exploded around 8 a.m. in central Moscow at the Lubyanka station, which is directly under the well-known headquarters of the Federal Security Service. About 45 minutes later, the second bomb suddenly exploded at the Park Kultury station, which is close to the popular leisure spot, Gorky Park. Witness Ivan Bukhradtse saw the devastating effects of the explosion firsthand at Park Kultury station and stated, “The metro staff and the police were very helpful. They reacted very well. The main problem was that they didn’t shut down the subway system. If they had stopped it immediately, there wouldn’t have been such big crowds.” The two subway stations were closed down after the attack but reopened by the evening rush hour at 4 p.m. Despite the terrible tragedy that occurred earlier in the day, many citizens still rode the subway out of necessity.

When asked to comment about the tragedy, President Dmitri A. Medvedev stated that the bombers who have attacked Moscow in the past were, “annihilated to ashes.” This statement infers that although the bombers killed themselves while causing an explosion in the subway systems, the other people involved will be found and killed. Prime Minister Vladimir Putin supported the President’s beliefs by stating, “The terrorists will be destroyed.” Prime Minister Putin also acknowledged that after identifying the remains of the two female bombers, it was hypothesized that they were connected to a terrorist group in the Caucasus region of southern Russia.        

Dzhanet Abdullayeva, one of the bombers, was barely 17 years old and was believed to have carried out the violent act in order to seek revenge on the federal forces that executed her husband last December. Her husband, 30 year old Islamist rebel Umalat Magomedov, enthralled the mind of this young teenager with the fundamentalist Islam religion. Maryam Sharipova believed to have been the other bomber responsible for the explosion at the Lubyanka station. Sharipova and Abdullayeva were both from the Dagestan region located in the Caucasus Mountains. When Sharipova’s father identified his daughter’s remains, he was astonished to discover that not only was she married to an extremist leader, but she was also affiliated with terrorist acts. Hiding behind a convincing façade, Sharipova made it seem as if she was a single schoolteacher who had no radical views connected to any religion. Although Abdullayeva’s husband was killed, Sharipova’s husband, Magomedali Vagabov is believed to still be alive and residing in a secret location. 

 

For more information on the subway explosion, please see the following articles:

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/04/07/world/europe/07moscow.html?scp=1&sq=moscow&st=cse

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/04/03/world/europe/03moscow.html?scp=3&sq=moscow&st=cse

 

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